SBIR Phase I 2019 National Aeronautics and Space Administration

 

Innovative Measurement of Airframe Noise Sources

The technical need in the solicitation calls for innovative source identification techniques for airframe noise sources, such as landing gear and high lift systems.

SBIR Phase II 2019 Department of Defense Navy

 

Predictions of the Acoustic Nearfield on a Carrier Deck

 

This SBIR effort will develop the OptiNav Functional Beamforming tool to make noise source characterizations of aircraft/engines be simpler, faster, and cheaper.  

 

SBIR Phase II 2015 National Aeronautics and Space Administration

 

Phased Array Technique for Low Signal-To-Noise Ratio Wind Tunnels

 

Noise measurement of aerospace vehicles is difficult and usually requires expensive, specialized facilities. With the proliferation of UAVs there is need for noise data, both for ISR and non-military vehicles. Wind tunnel testing is common and much less expensive. The innovation is a novel in-flow microphone array combined with the start of the art Functional Beamforming algorithm that makes it practical to measure UAV noise in a non-acoustic wind tunnel. The proposal calls for further development of the measurement technique so that it can be commercialized as a service using the Kirsten Wind Tunnel at the University of Washington.

SBIR Phase I 2014 National Aeronautics and Space Administration

Phased Array Technique for Low Signal-To-Noise Ratio Wind Tunnels

Closed wind tunnel beamforming for aeroacoustics has become more and more prevalent in recent years. Still, there are major drawbacks as current microphone arrays are rather larger and hard to install and conventional beamforming and deconvolution techniques do not work well in low signal-to-noise environments. Outlined in the proposal is a phased airfoil imaging microphone array located inside the wind tunnel which utilizes Functional Beamforming, a modification of conventional beamforming.

SBIR Phase II 2012 Department of Defense

Predictions of the Acoustic Nearfield on a Carrier Deck

An efficient acoustic holography technique for characterizing the noise source of tactical aircraft jet plumes was developed through the bench testing stage in Phase I. A full-scale array of 100 microphone locations was designed to be able to capture the noise of an F-18 in a simulated carrier launch, including effects of deck scrubbing and interactions with the jet blast deflector, in a few seconds of data acquisition. In Phase II, the technique and the array will be tested in model scale using the Small Hot Jet Acoustic Rig and the NASA-Glenn Research Center and in full scale at the Naval Air Station Patuxent River.
 

SBIR Phase I 2010 Department of Defense Navy

Predictions of the Acoustic Nearfield on a Carrier Deck

A numerical method for extrapolating jet noise from near-field microphone array to far field points will be developed. This software is needed to provide the source function to enable the Navy to use a commercial acoustic propagation code to predict the noise levels at the crew locations of aircraft carrier decks. The ultimate goal is to determine the benefit of applying noise reduction technology such as chevron nozzles.

SBIR Phase I 2002 Department of Transportation

 

Single Camera Dynamic 3D Surface Mapping System

 

The NHTSA has expressed a need for a system to measure the 3D time history of the deformation automobile interior structures during crash tests. A simple, innovative, approach that uses a single high speed video camera is proposed. The project will involve bench testing the concept and gathering information to prepare for full scale development in Phase II.